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MMR Vaccination and Autism

In recent years the high spike in Autism has caught the attention of many parents and doctors.  As parents become desperate for answers, many begin to believe there could be a link between MMR and autism. Across the country parents are crying out when their once healthy and happy child begins to regress in their development. Children that were playful weeks before suddenly become introverted and appear unhappy. [click to continue…]

Children from the age of birth to six have a scheduled amount of vaccinations they are recommended and required to receive. Below is a chart published by the “Centers for Disease and Control Prevention” which lists the vaccinations for your child from birth to the age of six.

  • Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis
  • Human Papillomavirus
  • Hepattitus B
  • Hepattitus A
  • Meningococcal
  • Pneumococcal
  • Inactivated Poliovirus
  • Influenze
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella
  • Varicella

Vaccination Schedule for Children

childhood measles

Children from the age of birth to six have a scheduled amount of vaccinations they are recommended and required to receive. Below is a chart published by the “Centers for Disease and Control Prevention” which lists the vaccinations for your child from birth to the age of six.

  • Hepattitus B
  • Rotavirus
  • DTP
  • Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis
  • Haemophilus Influenzae type B
  • Pneumococcal
  • Inactivated Poliovirus
  • Influenze
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella
  • Varicella
  • Hepatitis A
  • Meningococcal

child's first stepsChild development milestones are some of the most exciting moments of raising a child. From the first time they smile, to the first steps they take, to the first words they speak; every moment creates an exhilarating rush of happiness to any mother or father.

During these child developmental stages parents are there to nurture every step of their child’s development. Following is a list of child One Year Developmental Milestones. This list is based off of child development research found by CDC.gov, your online source for credible health information, and the official Web site of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Please note, every child develops at their own rate, so there is no reason to be alarmed if your child has not reached these stages yet.

Social and Emotional

  • Shy or anxious with strangers
  • Cries when mother or father leaves
  • Enjoys imitating people in his play
  • Shows specific preferences for certain people and toys
  • Tests parental responses to his actions during feedings
  • Tests parental responses to his behavior
  • May be fearful in some situations
  • Prefers mother and/or regular caregiver over all others
  • Repeats sounds or gestures for attention
  • Finger-feeds himself
  • Extends arm or leg to help when being dressed

Cognitive

  • Explores objects in many different ways (shaking, banging, throwing, dropping)
  • Finds hidden objects easily
  • Looks at correct picture when the image is named
  • Imitates gestures
  • Begins to use objects correctly (drinking from cup, brushing hair, dialing phone, listening to receiver)

Language

  • Pays increasing attention to speech
  • Responds to simple verbal requests
  • Responds to “no”
  • Uses simple gestures, such as shaking head for “no”
  • Babbles with inflection (changes in tone)
  • Says “dada” and “mama”
  • Uses exclamations, such as “Oh-oh!”
  • Tries to imitate words

Movement

  • Reaches sitting position without assistance
  • Crawls forward on belly
  • Assumes hands-and-knees position
  • Creeps on hands and knees
  • Gets from sitting to crawling or prone (lying on stomach) position
  • Pulls self up to stand
  • Walks holding on to furniture
  • Stands momentarily without support
  • May walk two or three steps without support

Hand and Finger Skills

  • Uses pincer grasp
  • Bangs two objects together
  • Puts objects into container
  • Takes objects out of container
  • Lets objects go voluntarily
  • Pokes with index finger
  • Tries to imitate scribbling

At seven months your child will become more interactive, and begins to respond to other people’s expressions of emotion. Babies during this age will start to understand the tones in your voice. Finally, the word “no” has an affect! [click to continue…]